100 Things Italians Do Different

And better.

Okay so I lied, I will not be listing an exact amount of 100 things but it goes to say that the lifestyle here is very different from that of the US. It’s nothing too drastic and hasn’t substantially impacted my ability to function here but it’s still different. With difference comes adjusting, but again, it’s nothing you can’t get used and actually has been a more positive experience than difficult. It really broadens your horizons and opens you up to new possibilities. As long as you are not resistant to the envelop of Italian culture surrounding you, you should be able to fit right in. Seriously, I mean it. Tourists will be coming to you for questions and you will know how to guide them. I’ve been here for two weeks and while I can’t say I’m on Rick Steve’s level, I’d say I feel confident in my knowledge of the Italian way. ALright, so here it goes:

  • A margarita is a plain cheese pizza- not a drink.
  • Some restaurants will charge you to use the bathroom or require that you make a purchase.
  • Pedestrians OWN the road. Drivers know to watch out for pedestrians because there is always a lot of them and it’s not uncommon for them to jaywalk or walk in the center of the road.
  • Italians value time and because of this businesses will close shop mid-day for leisure time and then open up again later.
  • Tap water is safe to drink.
  • It is disrespectful to leave your waste outside your door or building. Instead, you are responsible for taking your bags to the nearest garbage disposal drop off.
  • Garbage disposals centers are located throughout the residential areas. There are roughly 10-12 drop-off containers that are the size of an average kitchen trash bin. To collect the waste, cranes pick up the container and a whole unit hidden below it and empty it into the truck.
  • “Quite Hour” starts at 11 PM.
  • You can be fined for not separating your non-disposable waste from your organic or recyclable waste.
  • At a restaurant, you do not wait for the waiter to bring you your check. When you are ready to leave, you go upfront, tell them your order, and pay.
  • Almost everything delivers here.
  • There’s a telecom/bell system outside every household with the names of the residential owners.
  • Entrance into to an apartment building requires a key or someone from inside to come open the door for you.
  • Restaurant owners/waiters will typically get offended when you ask for sauce, seasoning, or a modification to their recipe.
  • You can be arrested for selling or purchasing any counterfeit brand products.
  • Many buildings in Florence do not have central air conditioning systems.
  • There isn’t Uber in Florence but there is Uber Eats.
  • Taxi drivers are in union.
  • Cars are not a necessity. Most people can get around by walking or using public transportation.
  • Restaurants will never serve you fountain or tap water.
  • Pizza is often eaten using a fork and knife.
  • At departure from airports, you can receive tax returns for all the registered purchases you’ve made that totaled over 135 Euros
  • Most roads are not paved but consist of laid out brick or stone.
  • Prices can be negotiated with sellers in the markets.
  • Restaurants and Gelato shops stay open until midnight or 1 AM.
  • Tips are generally not encouraged. In substitution for this , there can be a service fee on your check but that’s not always the case.
  • You have to wear gloves when picking fresh produce in the market.
  • Grocery stores charge for plastic bags.
  • Paninis are square rather than the typical baguette-like shape.

(P.S: order is random, these were not ranked).

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